The Shark
 

Poker Jargon

Ace High:

The hand of Ace High is one that simply has a high card of ace and nothing else, not even a pair.

Action:

Opportunity to act. If a player appears not to realize it's his turn, the dealer will say "Your action, sir."
Bets and raises. "If a third heart hits the board and there's a lot of action, you have to assume that somebody has made the flush."

Ajax:

poker slang for a starting hand with one ace and one jack

Ante:

A small portion of a bet contributed by each player to seed the pot at the beginning of a poker hand. Most hold'em games do not have an ante; they use "blinds" to get initial money into the pot.

All-In:

To run out of chips while betting or calling. In table stakes games, a player -may not go into his pocket for more money during a hand. If he runs out, a side pot is created in which he has no interest. However, he can still win the pot for which he had the chips. Example: "Poor Bob. He made quads against the big full house, but he was all-in on the second bet."

Back raise:

refers to when a player first makes a flat call, faces a raise from a player in a later position, and then re-raise that player.

Bad Beat:

To have a hand that is a large underdog beat a heavily favored hand. It is generally used to imply that the winner of the pot had no business being in the pot at all, and it was the wildest of luck that he managed to catch the one card in the deck that would win the pot. We won't give any examples; you will hear plenty of them during your poker career.

Big Blind:

The larger of the two blinds typically used in a hold'em game. The big blind is normally a full first round bet. See also "blind" and "small blind."

Blank:

A board card that doesn't seem to affect the standings in the hand. If the flop is A - J - T , then a turn card of 2 would be considered a blank. On the other hand, the 2 would not be.

Blind:

A forced bet (or partial bet) put in by one or more players before any cards are dealt. Typically, blinds are put in by players immediately to the left of the button. See also "live blind."

Bluff:

To bet with no made hand or a weaker hand disguised as strong.

Board:

All the community cards in a hold'em game - the flop, turn, and river cards together. Example: "There wasn't a single heart on the board."

Bottom Pair:

A pair with the lowest card on the flop. If you have A - 6 , and the flop comes K -T - 6 , you have flopped bottom pair.

Burn:

To discard the top card from the deck, face down. This is done between each betting round before putting out the next community card(s). It is security against any player recognizing or glimpsing the next card to be used on the board.

Button:

A white acrylic disk that indicates the (nominal) dealer. Also used to refer to the player on the button. Example: "Oh, the button raised."

Buy:

As in "buy the pot." To bluff, hoping to "buy" the pot without being called.
As in "buy the button." To bet or raise, hoping to make players between you and the button fold, thus allowing you to act last on subsequent betting rounds.

Call:

To put into the pot an amount of money equal to the most recent bet or raise. The term "see" (as in "I'll see that bet") is considered colloquial.

Calling Station:

A weak-passive player who calls a lot, but doesn't raise or fold much. This is the kind of player you like to have in your game.

Center Pot:

The first pot created during a poker hand, as opposed to one or more "side" pots created if one or more players goes all-in. Also "main pot."

Check:

To not bet, with the option to call or raise later in the betting round. Equivalent to betting zero dollars.
Another word for chip, as in poker chip.

Check Raise

To check and then raise when a player behind you bets. Occasionally you will hear people say this is not fair or ethical poker. Piffle. Almost all casinos permit check-raising, and it is an important poker tactic. It is particularly useful in low-limit hold'em where you need extra strength to narrow the field if you have the best hand.

Community Cards

Cards that are presented face-up in the middle of the poker table and shared among players in games like Hold'em and Omaha. These are also referred to as board cards or "the board".

Complete Hand:

A hand that is defined by all five cards - a straight, flush, full house or straight flush.

Connector

A hold'em starting hand in which the two cards are one apart in rank. Examples: KQs, 76.

Crack:

To beat a hand - typically a big hand. You hear this most often applied to pocket aces: "Third time tonight I've had pocket aces cracked."

Cripple:

As in "to cripple the deck." Meaning that you have most or all of the cards that somebody would want to have with the current board. If you have pocket kings, and the other two kings flop, you have crippled the deck.

Dealer:

The player in a poker game who actually (or theoretically) is dealing the cards. When a professional dealer (casino or cardroom) or automated dealer (online) is present - it is necessary to identify the player who would be dealing the cards because the blinds and the betting action are to the left of the dealer. This is done by utilizing a marker called a dealer button which travels around the table in a clockwise manner, moving to the next player after each hand is completed.

Dog:

Shortened form of "underdog."

Draw

To play a hand that is not yet good, but could become so if the right cards come. Example: "I'm not there yet - I'm drawing." Also used as a noun. Example: "I have to call because I have a good draw."

Draw Dead:

Trying to make a hand that, even if made, will not win the pot. If you're drawing to make a flush, and your opponent already has a full house, you are "drawing dead." Of course, this is a bad condition to be in.

Extra Blind:

A blind put in by a player just entering the game, returning to the game, or otherwise changing his position at the table. See also "blind" and "post."

Flop:

The first three community cards, put out face up, altogether.

Flush Draw

A hand where you have 4 of the 5 cards needed to make a flush. For example, if you are holding two clubs, and the board flops two more clubs, you would be holding a flush draw. You would need to draw an additional club to complete the flush.

Fold:

To forfeit any chance of winning the current pot in poker. To lay down your hand or throw your hand in instead of calling or raising a bet.

Foul:

A hand that may not be played for one reason or another. A player with a foul hand may not make any claim on any portion of the pot. Example: "He ended up with three cards after the flop, so the dealer declared his hand foul."

Free Card:

A turn or river card on which you don't have to call a bet because of play earlier in the hand (or because of your reputation with your opponents). For instance, if you are on the button and raise when you flop a flush draw, your opponents may check to you on the turn. If you make your flush on the turn, you can bet. If you don't get it on the turn, you can check as well, seeing the river card for "free."

Free Roll:

One player has a shot at winning an entire pot when he is currently tied with another player. For instance, suppose you have A - Q and your opponent has A - Q . The flop is Q - 5 - T . You are tied with your opponent right now, but are free rolling, because you can win the whole pot and your opponent can't. If no club comes, you split the pot with him; if it does come, you win the whole thing.

Hit:

As in "the flop hit me," meaning the flop contains cards that help your hand. If you have AK, and the flop comes K-7-2, it hit you.

Hole Cards:

Cards dealt face-down to a player - most commonly used when describing the first two player cards in Hold'em and the first four player cards in Omaha.

House

The establishment running the game. Example: "The $2 you put on the button goes to the house."

Implied Odds:

Pot odds that do not exist at the moment, but may be included in your calculations because of bets you expect to win if you hit your hand. For instance, you might call with a flush draw on the turn even though the pot isn't offering you quite 4:1 odds (your chance of making the flush) because you're sure you can win a bet from your opponent on the river if you make your flush.

Inside Straight Draw:

Seeking one specific card value to make a straight. For instance, a player holding 9-5 with a board of 2-7-6 can make a straight with any eight. This is also known as a gutshot straight draw.

Jackpot

A special bonus paid to the loser of a hand if he gets a very good hand beaten. In hold'em, the "loser" must typically get aces full or better beaten. In some of the large southern California card clubs, jackpots have gotten over $50,000. Of course, the jackpot is funded with money removed from the game as part of the rake.

Kicker

An unpaired card used to determine the better of two near-equivalent hands. For instance, suppose you have AK and your opponent has AQ. If the flop has an ace in it, you both have a pair of aces, but you have a king kicker. Kickers can be vitally important in hold'em.

Longhand:

A poker game with seven or more people.

Muck:

The pile of folded and burned cards in front of the dealer.

No-Limit:

A version of poker in which a player may bet any amount of chips (up to the number in front of him) whenever it is his turn to act. It is a very different game from limit poker. The best treatise on no-limit poker is in Doyle Brunson's Super/System.

Nuts:

The best possible hand given the board. If the board is K - J - T - 4 - 2 , then A - X is the nuts. You will occasionally hear the term applied to the best possible hand of a certain category, even though it isn't the overall nuts. For the above example, somebody with A - Q might say they had the "nut straight."

Offsuit:

A hold'em starting hand with two cards of different suits.

One-Gap:

A hold'em starting hand with two cards two apart in rank. Examples: J9s, 64.

Open-Ended Straight Draw:

Seeking one of two card values to make a straight. For instance, a player holding 9-8 with a board of 2-7-6 can make a straight with either a ten (6-7-8-9-T) or with a five (5-6-7-8-9). This is also known as an up-and-down straight draw.

Out:

A card that will make your hand win. Normally heard in the plural. Example: "Any spade will make my flush, so I have nine outs."

Overbet:

A raise/bet larger than the size of the current pot.

Overcall:

To call a bet after one or more others players have already called.

Overcard

A card higher than any card on the board. For instance, if you have AQ and the flop comes J-7-3, you don't have a pair, but you have two overcards.

Overpair

A pocket pair higher than any card on the flop. If you have QQ and the flop comes J-8-3, you have an overpair.

Pay Off:

To call a bet when the bettor is representing a hand that you can't beat, but the pot is sufficiently large to justify a call anyway. Example: "He played it exactly like he made the flush, but I had top set so I paid him off."

Pocket:

Your unique cards that only you can see. For instance, "He had pocket sixes" (a pair of sixes), or "I had ace-king in the pocket."

Pocket Pair:

A hold'em starting hand with two cards of the same rank, making a pair. Example: "I had big pocket pairs seven times in the first hour. What else can you ask for?"

Pot-Limit:

A version of poker in which a player may bet up to the amount of money in the pot whenever it is his turn to act. Like no-limit, this is a very different game from limit poker.

Pot Odds:

The amount of money in the pot compared to the amount you must put in the pot to continue playing. For example, suppose there is $60 in the pot. Somebody bets $6, so the pot now contains $66. It costs you $6 to call, so your pot odds are 11:1. If your chance of having the best hand is at least 1 out of 12, you should call. Pot odds also apply to draws. For instance, suppose you have a draw to the nut flush with one card left to come. In this case, you are about a 4:1 underdog to make your flush. If it costs you $8 to call the bet, then there must be about $32 in the pot (including the most recent bet) to make your call correct.

Preflop:

The betting round after you are dealt your two hole cards and there are no cards on the board yet.

Quads:

Four of a kind.

Ragged:

A flop (or board) that doesn't appear to help anybody very much. A flop that came down J - 6 - 2 would look ragged.

Rainbow:

A flop that contains three different suits, thus no flush can be made on the turn. Can also mean a complete five card board that has no more than two of any suit, thus no flush is possible.

Raise:

To increase the amount of the current bet.

Rake

An amount of money taken out of every pot by the dealer. This is the cardroom's income.

Rank:

The numerical value of a card (as opposed to its suit). Example: "jack," "seven."

River:

The fifth and final community card, put out face up, by itself. Also known as "fifth street." Metaphors involving the river are some of poker's most treasured clichés, e.g., "He drowned in the river."

Rock

A player who plays very tight, not very creatively. He raises only with the best hands. A real rock is fairly predictable: if he raises you on the end, you can throw away just about anything but the nuts.

Scare Card:

A card that may well turn the best hand into trash. If you have T - 8 and the flop comes Q - J - 9 , you almost assuredly have the best hand. However, a turn card of T would be very scary because it would almost guarantee that you are now beaten.

Second Pair:

A pair with the second highest card on the flop. If you have A - T , and the flop comes K - T - 6 , you have flopped second pair. See "top pair."

Sell:

As in "sell a hand." In a spread-limit game, this means betting less than the maximum when you have a very strong hand, hoping players will call whereas they would not have called a maximum bet.

Semi-Bluff:

A powerful concept first discussed by David Sklansky. It is a bet or raise that you hope will not be called, but you have some outs if it is. A semi-bluff may be correct when betting for value is not correct, a pure bluff is not correct, but the combination of the two may be a positive expectation play. Example: you have K - Q , and the flop is T - 5 - J . If you bet now, it's a semi-bluff. You probably don't have the best hand, and you'd like to see your opponents fold immediately. Nevertheless, if you do get callers, you could still improve to the best hand.

Set

Three of a kind when you have two of the rank in your hand, and there is one on the board.

Shorthand:

A poker game with six or fewer people.

Short Stack:

A number of chips that is not very many compared to the other players at the table. If you have $10 in front of you, and everybody else at the table has over $100, you are playing on a short stack.

Showdown:

The point at which all players remaining in the hand turn their cards over and determine who has the best hand - i.e. after the fourth round of betting is completed. Of course, if a final bet or raise is not called, there is no showdown.

Side Pot:

A pot created in which a player has no interest because he has run out of chips. Example: Al bets $6, Beth calls the $6, and Carl calls, but he has only $2 left. An $8 side pot is created that either Al or Beth can win, but not Carl. Carl, however, can still win all the money in the original or "center" pot.

Slow Play:

To play a strong hand weakly so more players will stay in the pot.

Small Blind:

The smaller of two blind bets typically used in a hold'em game. Normally, the small blind is one-third to two-thirds of a first round bet. See also "big blind" and "blind."

Smooth Call:

To call. Smooth call often implies slow playing a strong hand. Example: "I flopped the nut flush but just smooth called when the guy in front of me bet - I didn't want to scare anybody out."

Split Pot:

A pot that is shared by two or more players because they have equivalent hands.

Split Two Pair:

A two pair hand in which one of each of your cards' ranks appears on the board as well. Example: you have T9, the flop is T-9-5, you have a split two pair. This is in comparison to two pair where there is a pair on the board. Example: you have T9, the flop is 9-5-5.

Spread-limit:

A betting structure in which a player may bet any amount in a range on every betting round. A typical spread-limit structure is $2-$6, where a player may bet as little as $2 or as much as $6 on every betting round.

Suited:

A hold'em starting hand in which the two cards are the same suit. Example: "I had to play J-3 - it was suited."

Tell:

A clue or hint that a player unknowingly gives about the strength of his hand, his next action, etc. May originally be from "telegraph" or the obvious use that he "tells" you what he's going to do before he does it.

Tilt:

To play wildly or recklessly. A player is said to be "on tilt" if he is not playing his best, playing too many hands, trying wild bluffs, raising with bad hands, etc.

Toke or tip

A small amount of money (typically $.50 or $1.00) given to the dealer by the winner of a pot. Quite often, tokes represent the great majority of a dealer's income.

Top Set:

The highest possible trips. Example: you have T - T , and the flop comes T - 8 - 9 . You have flopped top set.

Trips:

Three of a kind.

Turn:

The fourth community card. Put out face up, by itself. Also known as "fourth street."

Under the Gun:

The position of the player who acts first on a betting round. For instance, if you are one to the left of the big blind, you are under the gun before the flop.